Where to stay in Death Valley National Park

Despite Death Valley national park being one of the largest parks in north America, there are very few places to stay in the national park! Given the extreme climate of Death Valley, it is perhaps unsurprising that there are not that many huge options. There are however different types of accommodation in Death Valley to suit every budget. From free campsites in Death Valley to luxury cabins, this is the ultimate guide to accommodation and where to stay in Death Valley national park.

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The Inn – Photo by Tamara Wilcox

Types of accommodation in Death Valley

There are different types of accommodation in Death Valley to suit every style and budget. You can bring your tent and check out one of the 12 campsites in Death Valley. There are four hotels in Death Valley National Park for those with a mid-range budget. For visitors looking for a little bit of luxury there are also deluxe options for an unforgettable trip to Death Valley. Here is a breakdown of the types of accommodation in Death Valley, starting with free accommodation to the high-end options.

Free accommodation in Death Valley

There is free accommodation in Death Valley?! Many things that first-time visitors to Death Valley do not know is that there are actually free campsites in Death Valley national park. If you do not mind packing your own tent you can have a very affordable trip to this Californian national park.

camping in Death Valley

Out of the nine national service campsites in Death Valley national park, four of these campsites are free.

List of free campsites in Death Valley National Park:

  • Wildrose campsite in Death Valley
  • Emigrant campsite in Death Valley
  • Thorndike campsite in Death Valley
  • Mahogany Flat campsite in Death Valley

Please bear in mind that Emigrant campsite is a tent only campsite. Thorndike campsite and Mahogany Flat campsite both close in winter too. Mahogany Flat also requires a four-wheel drive to reach.

All of the national service campsites in Death Valley operate on a first come first serve basis.

Click here to find out further information about staying at these free campsites in Death Valley.

Whilst these campsites are great if you are on a budget, they are not as central as some of the other campsites. For example, Mahogany Flat is 1 hour and 45 minutes from Furnace Creek! If you would like to stay in a more central Death Valley location, read on to find out about more campsites and other budget accommodation in Death Valley national park.

Budget Accommodation in Death Valley National Park

If you are on a tight budget, there are a few great budget options in Death Valley National park.

You can choose between staying in a tent or if you would like something a little studier a motel or hotel room.

Cheap campsites in Death Valley National Park

There are 12 campsites in Death Valley National Park. 9 of these campsites are owned by the National Park Service. These campsites are situated in the West, the centre and the North of the National Park. Four of these campsites are free but these tend to be away from the heart of the park. If you are looking for a cheap campsite in Death Valley, not too far from Furnace Creek have a look at the following budget options.

National Park Services Campsites in the centre of Death Valley National Park

Furnace Creek Campsite in Death Valley National Park

This campsite is very central as it is the closest to the park visitor centre. Rates vary depending on which time of year you visit. Visitors can enjoy being close to all the major Death Valley sites as well as having access to water and flush toilets. There are 136 sites at Furnace Creek Campsite in Death Valley National Park.

Map of budget campsites in Death Valley

Texas Spring Campsite in Death Valley National Park

Another great budget accommodation option in Death Valley National Park is Texas Spring campsite. There are 92 sites here. It is also very central and a perfect place to catch the Zabriskie point sunset from. It costs just $16 a night to stay here.

Sunset Campsite in Death Valley National Park

This is the largest campsite in Death Valley National Park. There are 270 sites in the Sunset Campsite. You are not too far from the Furnace Creek services with the general store etc. One night at Sunset Campsite costs $14.

Privately Owned budget campsites in central Death Valley National Park

Fiddler’s Campground

Fiddler’s Campground is a privately owned campground in Death Valley National Park. The site is very central. You also have a few fun features such as access to a swimming pool and free wifi!

Furnace Creek RV Resort

Another privately owned campsite in Death Valley National Park is the Furnace Creek RV Resort. As it sounds, the resort is located in Furnace Creek and offers full hook-ups. Guests have access to water, showers, flush toilets, wifi and swimming pool!

If you are approaching Death Valley from the West, you may want to stay in the Western part of Death Valley. There are numerous budget options in Western Death Valley.

National Park Service Campsite in Western Death Valley:

Stovepipe Wells Campsite

Stovepipe Wells is a popular choice for visitors approaching Death Valley from the West. Located just around the corner from Mesquite Flats you will easily be able to watch one of the best sunsets in Death Valley National Park. There are 190 sites at Stovepipe Wells. You will have access to water and flush toilets. There is also a gas station nearby if you need to fill up.

One night costs $14.

Privately owned campsite in Western Death Valley:

Panamint Springs Resort

Panamint Springs Resort is right on the edge of Death Valley National Park. They have 63 sites for campers. They also have tents that are already constructed but you need to bring your own bedding. Panamint Springs Resort has its own general store, restaurant and gas station too.

Check out the current availability at Panamint Springs by using the search box below.

Booking.com

These are the budget options for camping in Death Valley National Park. Yet if you are someone who would prefer to stay in an actual room here are some budget hotel options in Death Valley National Park.

Budget Rooms in Death Valley National Park

Patio Room in Stovepipe Wells

At the higher end of our budget spectrum there are the patio rooms in Stovepipe Wells. Stovepipe Wells is not far from Furnace Creek meaning you may prefer paying a little extra to stay near the heart of the park.

The Patio Rooms at Stovepipe Wells cost around $150 per night (2019). These rooms will accommodation 1-2 travellers and include air conditioning, a TV, a small fridge, a coffee maker and a desk. There are also private bathrooms. Bare in mind that this rooms are very snug and cannot accommodate any extras for infants such as a crib.

Rooms in Panamint Springs

panamint springs

Panamint Springs has a range of motel-style rooms which travellers can snap up from around $100 in low season. Click on the booking.com tool to see if you can grab a budget room for your trip to Death Valley National Park.

To see the current rooms Panamint Springs has on offer, use the Booking.com search box below!

Booking.com

Mid-range Accommodation Options in Death Valley National Park

If you not too cash strapped and are looking at staying at one of the mid-range options in Death Valley National park, there are a few places to choose from.

Standard Room in Stovepipe Wells

Fancy watching the Sunset from Stovepipe Wells?
Photo by Jeff Dunn

The Standard Room in Stovepipe Wells costs $179 (excluding tax and resort fees) and offers everything you need to be comfortable. There is air conditioning, a TV, coffee maker, small fridge, one twin bed and one full bed. There are also private bathrooms with showers. Stovepipe Wells Village is a great place to base yourself during your trip to Death Valley National park. You are close to Mosaic Canyon, the Mesquite Flat Sand dunes and not too far from Furnace Creek.

The Cottage in Panamint Springs Resort

cottage panamint

If you are travelling as a family, the cottage in Panamint Springs may be a good mid-range option. The cottage has two bedrooms, a living room, its own private bathroom, comes with breakfast and can fit 6 people. Rates range from $184.00 – $254.00 per night depending on what time of year you visit Death Valley National park. This may not be the cheapest option if you are just two people, but as a family looking for their own space the cottage in Panamint Springs could be a great place to stay in Death Valley.

To see if the cottage at Panamint Springs is free during your trip dates, use the search box below!

Booking.com

The Ranch Rooms at the Ranch in Death Valley

Rooms at the Ranch can range from $125 to $199 a night. The Ranch is said to be a great place for families to stay. There is a Western-style village complete with post office and store. Rooms at the Ranch all come with two queen beds, air conditioning, hair dryers, coffee makers, TV, private bath and mini-refrigerators. It’s central location, makes the Ranch a great place to stay for first time visitors to Death Valley National park.

Luxury Accommodation Options in Death Valley National Park

The Inn Death Valley Tamara Wilcox
Treat yourself to a Death Valley anniversary at the Inn!
Photo by Tamara Wilcox

Looking to stay somewhere more luxurious during your trip to Death Valley National Park? There are a few high-end accommodation options allowing you to have a truly unforgettable experience in Death Valley National park.

The Deluxe Room in Stovepipe Wells

stovepipe wells deluxe room

The Deluxe Room in Stovepipe Wells is one of the high-end options in Death Valley National park. At $226.00 (per night, does not include tax, no resort fees) this is a very comfortable place to stay. The room comes with all standard amenities as well as bathrooms with granite counter tops and stone floors.

Treat yourself to a nice meal in their restaurant or a drink in the saloon bar and enjoy your stay at the Deluxe Room in Stovepipe Wells.

Suites at The Inn in Death Valley

Suite at The Inn in Death Valley
Photo by Tamara Wilcox

Pamper yourself by staying at the historic Inn in Furnace Creek. The Inn is situated in a green oasis, fed by an underwater creek. There is a spring-fed swimming pool, golf course and garden full of date palms. The Suites at The Inn all include a king-sized bed, a living room and a large bathroom.

Check out what dates are free at The Inn in the search box to book your stay!

Booking.com

The Miner’s Cabin in Panamint Springs

Panamint Springs Resort Honeymoon cabin
The Miner’s Inn at Panamint Springs

For a luxurious desert experience, consider staying in the Miner’s Cabin in Panamint Springs. This brand-new cabin is on the edge of the desert with its porch overlooking the rocky landscape. The cabin has its own bathroom, queen sized bed and fridge. Grab a few beers from the Panamint Springs bar, take them back to your porch and star gaze with your loved one. The next day you can fill up on a great breakfast to fuel your Death Valley itinerary!

We stayed in the Miner’s Cabin and loved the experience! Waking up and seeing the desert out of your front door is an epic feeling! It is also a great Instagram spot in Death Valley national park.

The Miner’s Cabin costs between $199 -$299 (excluding tax) a night but it is worth it!

To see if the Miner’s Cabin is free on your trip dates to Death Valley, use the booking.com search box below!

Booking.com

The Casitas at The Inn in Death Valley national park

The Inn is an Oasis in the desert.
Photo by Tamara Wilcox

For the ultimate private luxurious stay in Death Valley, treat yourself to a Casita at the Inn which is a four-diamond resort.

Spacious casitas of over 500 square feet are located within an oasis of date palms. Casitas all come with their own complimentary golf cart. The rooms have either a king bed or 2 queen beds. There is also a living room with a wet bar. Just imagine sipping on a cocktail whilst hearing the wind rustling through the palm leaves above.  

The brand-new casitas cost anywhere from $378 to $550 a night.

Where should I stay in Death Valley ?

Overwhelmed at where to stay in Death Valley?!

Whilst a few visitors recommend staying outside of the park, Death Valley national park is huge. This means that staying outside of the park just adds on time driving when you could be exploring this national park! If you are short on time you want to make sure you are staying in the national park itself.

Map of hotel accommodation in Death Valley National Park

First-time visitors should stay at accommodation along Highway 190. The Highway 190 has most of Death Valleys famous sites. If you stay on this highway, you maximise the time you have during your stay in Death Valley national park. Furnace Creek is the most central place to stay in Death Valley and is perfect in the colder months. Yet, if you are staying in Death Valley in summer, Panamint Springs will be a much cooler place to stay. Stovepipe Wells is another great choice as it is close to some other wonderful things to see in Death Valley.

Use this map on booking.com to see availability on your Death Valley travel dates.

Booking.com

If you have more time to spare, perhaps consider one of the campsites away from Highway 190. It will be much quieter and you could find some of that desert solitude that so many come to Death Valley to find.

How long should I spend in Death Valley?

Death Valley is the largest national park outside of Alaska! Many people try to squeeze everything into a day as they drive through the national park. We made that mistake and wished we had booked two nights rather than one night! You should allocate at least 2 full days to visiting Death Valley to explore most of the main sites. If you would like to explore further a field or have a go at one of the epic hikes in Death Valley give yourself more time to explore. There is so much to see here and do not underestimate the distances between the different scenic spots.

Where would you like to stay in Death Valley?

Would you stay in the Miner’s Cabin?

Have you been inspired to stay in Death Valley national park? Would you like to watch the stars on the porch of the cabin at Panamint springs or check out the spring-fed pool at the Oasis? Let us know in the comments below which accommodation in Death Valley you would like to stay in!

Places to stay in Death Valley national park! The ultimate accommodation guide!  Wondering about where to stay in Death Valley? Check out this list of different accommodation in Death Valley. From budget accommodation in the desert to a luxury stay at an oasis! When will you want to stay in this lovely national park? #deathvalley #deathvalleyaccommodation #californiaPlaces to stay in Death Valley national park! The ultimate accommodation guide!  Wondering about where to stay in Death Valley? Check out this list of different accommodation in Death Valley. From budget accommodation in the desert to a luxury stay at an oasis! When will you want to stay in this lovely national park? #deathvalley #deathvalleyaccommodation #californiaPlaces to stay in Death Valley national park! The ultimate accommodation guide!  Wondering about where to stay in Death Valley? Check out this list of different accommodation in Death Valley. From budget accommodation in the desert to a luxury stay at an oasis! When will you want to stay in this lovely national park? #deathvalley #deathvalleyaccommodation #californiaPlaces to stay in Death Valley national park! The ultimate accommodation guide!  Wondering about where to stay in Death Valley? Check out this list of different accommodation in Death Valley. From budget accommodation in the desert to a luxury stay at an oasis! When will you want to stay in this lovely national park? #deathvalley #deathvalleyaccommodation #california

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